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AHIT success stories: Dan Kutchin

AHIT alumnus Dan Kutchin started Northern Wisconsin-based HomeEx in 2012. Five years into the business, the couple’s home inspection service has hit its stride.

Tips for preparing a home for changes in climate

Every household should have an emergency plan that includes an emergency kit containing a flashlight, first aid supplies, spare keys, cash, a change of clothing, sleeping bag, a three day supply of bottled water and copies of important documents and forms of ID.
By |February 29th, 2016|News, Training|0 Comments

Bonus rooms and additions (Part two)

In part two, AHIT senior technical instructor Bill Ross discussed three additional areas that inspectors should scrutinize when inspecting bonus rooms and additions: attic conversions, heat sources, and decks.
Attic conversions
Attic spaces and lofts are often converted into habitable rooms. The minimum dimension for any habitable room by most codes is 7 feet, with a total minimum area of […]

Bonus rooms and additions: Same safety measures apply

Bonus rooms and additions should be inspected for the same issues of safety and habitability as the rest of the property.

How to inspect winterized, foreclosed or vacant homes

Inspecting a winterized/foreclosed home does not entail a different inspection report or different inspection procedures compared to a lived-in home. Yet there are definitely issues that can arise in a winterized/foreclosed home that you typically will not come across in a lived in home, for obvious reasons.

A truly green home is golden

When inspectors test a home for volatile organic compounds, which are chemicals that in higher volumes can contribute to health problems inside homes, they should consider the unhealthy effects of fragrances of any kind and natural substances, such as citrus or pine, according to Blazovsky.

Home inspection marketing 101

A successful home inspector is a business owner utilizing proven home inspection marketing tools and methods in order to promote the services that they offer to potential clients and referral sources.

Snow-covered roof inspections

You might not be able to see the entire roof, but a partial inspection is better than nothing. Be sure to disclaim what you did not see. Typically, you would either inspect or not inspect an individual roof face. If it is only partially visible, record it as not visible.

Performing winter air conditioning inspections

The main obstacle in reviewing the A/C is the outdoor temperature. As we all know, you should not operate an A/C unit (or heat pump in the cooling mode) when the outdoor temperature is below about 60°F or you risk damaging or “slugging” the compressor.

The process of inspecting a metal roof

As a home inspector, it is important to understand the differences and procedures for the various types of roofs you will encounter as different types of roofs have different materials that the inspector needs to be familiar with.